Ingles

Conditional

1. First conditional: If I have enough money, I will go to Japan.
2. Second conditional: If I had enough money, I would go to Japan.
3. Third conditional: If I had had enough money, I would have gone to Japan.

  1. First conditional

1. Nature: Open condition, what is said in the condition is possible.
2. Time: This condition refers either to present or to future time.
e.g. If he is late, we will have to go without him.
If my mother knows about this, we are in serious trouble.

  1. Second conditional

1. Nature: unreal (impossible) or improbable situations.
2. Time: present; the TENSE is past, but we are talking about the present, now.
e.g. If I knew her name, I would tell you.
If I were you, I would tell my father.
Compare: If I become president, I will change the social security system. (Said by a presidential candidate)
If I became president, I would change the social security system. (Said by a schoolboy: improbable)
If we win this match, we are qualified for the semifinals.
If I won a million pounds, I would stop teaching. (improbable)

  1. Third conditional

1. Nature: unreal
2. Time: Past (so we are talking about a situation that was not so in the past.)
e.g. If you had warned me, I would not have told your father about that party.(But you didn't, and I have).

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  • When

- When I retire, I'll travel around the world.
- As soon as I arrive, I'll phone you
- By the time we get home, It will be dark.

Used to

  • We can use both used to and would to talk about repeated events and actions in the past:

My grandfather used to/would walk five kilometres each morning.

Used to do vs would

"What is the different between used to and would?"

We can use both used to and would to talk about repeated events and actions in the past:

My grandfather used to/would walk five kilometres each morning.
She would/used to bake a big chocolate cake every Sunday.

If you want to talk about repeated states in the past, you must use used to:

He used to be a baker (NOT He would be …)
I used to have a black cat called Maisy (NOT I would have …)

  • Used to do vs used to doing

The use of used to do is dealt with above. Used to doing, or be used to doing has a different meaning. We use it to talk about things that are familiar, and not strange or new:

It took him a while until he was used to driving on the left-hand side of the road.
I am used to getting up at six o'clock in the morning.

Note that this structure can be followed by a noun or noun phrase, as well as an –ing form:

We live near the airport, so we are used to the noise of planes.
John lived in Mexico, so he is used to very hot food.

Apart from the verb to be, the verbs get, grow and become can also be used before used to doing. They are used to describe the process that leads to something being familiar. The first example above was:

It took him a while until he was used to driving on the left-hand side of the road.

When he first arrived in England, he wasn't used to driving on the left-hand side of the road. But after a while, in which he was practising his driving (getting used to driving on the left), he ended up being familiar with it.

See these other examples:

She grew used to him staying up late at night and working.
The gorilla eventually became used to its new cage.

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Connectives / Linkers

Present tense & future

  • Present continuous: Arrangements
  • Will: Reactions, predictions, promises
  • Present Simple: Future timetable events

Either/Neither

I would like either the blue suit or the gray suit.
I would like neither the orange suit nor the purple suit.
I would not like either the orange suit or the purple suit.

Have / Have got

  • Have/Have got = para posesión de cosas o caracteristica personal
  • solo Have = Para acciones o experiencias
  • Have got NO se utiliza para pasado/futuro

Position

1. If the sentence has one verb in it (e.g. no auxiliary verb) we usually put the adverb in the middle of the sentence, i.e. after the subject and before the verb
2. The adverb usually comes after the verb "be"
3. If the sentence has more than one verb in it (e.g. auxiliary verb) we usually put the adverb after the first part of the verb
4. For emphasis we can put the adverb at the beginning or end of the sentence.
5. When using adverbs of frequency in the question form, put the adverb before the main verb.
6. When using adverbs of frequency in the negative form, put the adverb before the main verb.

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